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Car use drops on UK roads due to fuel taxes

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New figures have shown that due to the ongoing cost of running a car, car use has dropped to its lowest level in eight years.

The figures produced by The Department of Transport show that road use has fell for the third year in a row for the first time in 60 years.

With the cost of MOT testing, taxing a car, car insurance and general wear and tear issues and petrol adding to the list makes owning and running a car more expensive each year.

It was also revealed that less than £1 in every £3 collected in motoring taxes goes towards maintaining UK Roads.

With roads not being looked after motorists are running into pot holes and other problems that cause damage to their car costing them money.

Traffic volumes have also fallen to 308.1 billion miles last year showing a 1.6% fall compared to the year before and this being the lowest since 2002.

Petrol sales have also declined by 1.5 billion litres since 2008 as a result of high prices, with low income families in rural areas being the most affected by costs.

Keith Peat, of the Association of British Drivers said: “Prices have now got so high that it is hurting the economy, we have heard of cases where people have had to give up work because they can no longer afford to drive in.”

A few months ago there was going to be an increase in petrol prices in January and August however Conservative MP Robert Halfon voiced his opinions on the planned fuel increase, and called on the government to scrap the plans and he also set up an e-petition against the increase.

The petition called on the government to scrap their plans which was to put a 3p rise on petrol prices in January and a further 1p added to this in August 2012.

Successfully the petition worked and the planned increase in petrol prices was cancelled for January 2012 the August rise was still in place but was reduced to 3p.

The Government have insisted they are doing all they can to help motorists stay on the roads investing in £4.5 billion in the last two years, many motorists however are asking where the money has gone.

Last year’s figures revealed that fuel taxes raised £27 billion and vehicle exercise duty raised £5 billion, only £5.7 billion of the £32 billion was spend on roads and £3.75 billion on main carriageways.

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By Amanda Bainbridge