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Most expensive car insurance premiums revealed

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Research has found that footballers and racing drivers have the most expensive car insurance premiums compared to any other occupation.

Insurers calculate a premium based on risk factors which includes the drivers occupation. The latest figures have shown that an extravagant occupation can result in a pricey premium.

Moneysupermarket.com has investigated into which occupations are cheaper for car insurance in the UK. Those that were found to have costly premiums were TV presenters, scrap dealers, funfair employees and dancers. However nurses, coast guards and bursars were found to have the cheapest premiums.

Surprisingly racing drivers topped the list with their average premium standing at £1,591. Closely followed were footballers with an average premium standing at £1,554. Reasoning behind this is due to them owning expensive top of the range vehicles with modifications and because they are worth a lot of money to their club and sponsors.

The cheapest occupation that was found in the research was a state enrolled nurse with the average premium costing £255. Others included head teachers, magistrate and matron.

The figures have highlighted that depending on a person’s occupation it can have a substantial difference to their car insurance premium.

Kevin Pratt, insurance expert at MoneySupermarket, said: “Insurers have built up a bank of knowledge of how those who have a particular profession behave behind the wheel. Mostly it plays into the typical age and gender of the driver.

“However with some professions it might not be so clear cut and it might be other factors of a driver's profile and personality that has more bearing on the premium they pay.

“Sometimes people find it hard to class their profession using the lists provided by insurers but I advise people looking for cover concentrate more on picking the most accurate description on the list than the one that might provide the cheapest quote."

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By Amanda Bainbridge